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Travel Phrases using Alternate Alphabets

This page presents the Four Essential Travel Phrases in English (mostly) using alternate alphabets and writing systems.
The purpose of alternative writing systems vary: phonetics/phonemics, secrecy, efficincy, aesthetics, fiction, personal enjoyment, etc.

Items shown below:  A-tom-tom Code, Celestial, colorAlphabet, Daggers, Deseret, Dscript, Enochian, Ewellic, Grand Alphabet, Hexahue, Magi, Malachim, Rotor Script, Shwa, Theban, Transitus Fluvii, and Visible Speech
 
Items on other pages:  English Spelling Reform (includes Latin-alphabet variations such as IPA & Unifon), Shavian & Quickscript, shorthand, tactile systems (Braille & Moon Type), Tolkien's runes, and Pop Culture (additional alphabets including those from STARGATE and Star Wars)
 

top A-tom-tom Code

The A-tom-tom code is an alternative alphabet for English using different combinations of forward and backward slashes. It was modelled on Morse Code and created for fun by Hayden.

1) //\\/\\/\/\///\ /\\\\/\ \//\/\/ /\///\//\/\//?

2) //\\/\\/\/\///\ /\\\\/\ \\/\/\\/\ ///\/////\\?

3) //\\/\\/\/\///\ /\\\\/\ \\/\/\\/\ ////\//?

4) /////\/ \////\/\\/\ \\/\/\/\//\////\\ \///\ \\/\/\\/\/\///\!

Writing system information at Omniglot



top Celestial Alphabet (also known as the Angelic alphabet)

Attributed to Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa, the Hebrew and Greek-based Celestial alphabet was published in 1531 in his Libri Tres de Occulta Philosophia (Three Books of Occult Philosophy).

[Celestial Alphabet]

Language information at Wikipedia and Omniglot




top

colorAlphabet

The artist Christian Faur invented the colorAlphabet to map English to colors for both writing and more abstract artwork.

[colorAlphabet]

Writing system information at Christian Faur's website and Omniglot



top Daggers Alphabet

The Alphabet of the Daggers was used for magical purposes in Aleister Crowley's 1911 book The Vision and the Voice. It is a substitution cypher based on the Latin alphabet.

[Daggers]

Writing system information at Omniglot




top

Deseret

The Deseret (or Mormon) alphabet was created in the 1850s to replace the Latin alphabet with a more phonetic system.
It failed to catch on, even in Utah, and was not promoted after the 1860s.

[Deseret]

Deseret fonts in the Gallery of Unicode Fonts

Writing system information at Wikipedia and Omniglot



top Dscript (also known as Directional script, Dimensional script or Doodle script)

Dscript was created by Matthew DeBlock as a cursive script for English.

[Dscript]

Writing system information at Omniglot and Matthew DeBlock's Dscript site



top Enochian

The Enochian alphabet was used by John Dee and his seer Edward Kelley in the late 1500s. The men claimed that it was revealed to them by angels.

[Enochian]

Writing system information at Wikipedia and Omniglot




top

Ewellic

The Ewellic alphabet was invented in 1980 by Doug Ewell as an alternate, phonemic way to write English.

[Ewellic]

Ewellic fonts and a comprehensive Unicode test page for Ewellic in the Gallery of Unicode Fonts

Writing system information at Doug Ewell's web page and Omniglot



top

Grand Alphabet

Matthew Whitaker created the Grand Alphabet to unify the writing systems of English, German and Russian.

[English using the Grand Alphabet]

See also German and Russian using the Grand Alphabet

Writing system information at Omniglot



top Hexahue

Hexahue was created by Josh Cramer. It uses patterns of six colors to represent each letter of the Latin alphabet.

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Writing system information at Geocache tools




top Magi

The Alphabet of the Magi was invented by Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim (known as Paracelsus) in the 1500s for engraving angelic names upon talismans.

[Magi]

Language information at Wikipedia and Omniglot



top

Malachim

Attributed to Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa, the Hebrew-based Malachim alphabet was published in 1531 in his Libri Tres de Occulta Philosophia (Three Books of Occult Philosophy).

Malachim was popular with secret societies and still sees limited use by Freemasons.

[Malachim]

Writing system information at Wikipedia, sacred-texts.com, and Omniglot



top

Rotor Script

Here's how Simon Whitechapel describes his Rotor script:

Rotor is an experimental script created to realize the concept of letters that literally move on the "page". It consists of seventeen minimal pairs of graphemes in which the members of each pair are identical except for the way they move: for example, unvoiced consonants turn clockwise and voiced consonants anti-clockwise (the only letter that is unambiguous at rest is i, consisting of two "zoophors" turning clockwise). The letter shapes are based on vegetable and microscopic life.

The effect is both mesmerizing and nauseating:

[w][h][e][e][r][e][ ] [i][s][ ] [m][y][_] [r][o][o][m][?]

[w][h][e][e][r][e][ ] [i][s][ ] [t][h][e][ ] [b][e][a][c][h][?]

[w][h][e][e][r][e][ ] [i][s][ ] [t][h][e][ ] [b][a][r][?]

[d][o][n]['][t][ ] [t][o][u][c][h][ ] [m][e][ ] [t][h][e][r][e][!]

Writing system information at Omniglot



top

Shwa

Shwa was created by Peter Cyrus around 2002 as an alternative script for English and other languages.

[Shwa]

Writing system information at shwa.org



top

Theban

Although its origins are unknown, Theban was first published in 1531 in Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa's Libri Tres de Occulta Philosophia (Three Books about Occult Philosophy).

Also called the Runes of Honorius and the Witches' Alphabet, it is used today by some modern Wicca as a substitution cipher.

[Theban]

Writing system information at Wikipedia, Eric S. Raymond's draft Theban Unicode proposal, and Omniglot



top Transitus Fluvii (also known as Passage du Fleuve in French and Passing the River in English)

Attributed to Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa, the Hebrew-based Transitus Fluvii alphabet was published in 1531 in his Libri Tres de Occulta Philosophia (Three Books of Occult Philosophy).

Transitus Fluvii]

Language information at Wikipedia and Omniglot



top

Visible Speech Notation

Visible Speech Notation was developed by Alexander Melville Bell in 1867. This phonetic alphabet was used in America in the 1800s to help deaf children learn spoken language. The components of the symbols convey information about the sound to be produced. Because of that, Visible Speech is categorized as an "iconic notation".

In 1880 Henry Sweet, a former pupil of Bell's, published an updated version called the "Revised Organic Alpahabet". His changes were based in part on years of practical use of Bell's original system. In Britan, Sweet's version became preferred. Sweet was a supporter of the FTA (Dhi Fonètik Tîcerz' Asóciécon) which evolved into the International Phonetic Association.


Bell's Visible Speech notation

[Bell's Visible Speech notation]

Sweet's revised Visible Speech notation (also known as the Revised Organic Alphabet)

[Sweet's revision of Visible Speech notation]

Visible Speech fonts and a comprehensive Unicode test page for Visible Speech in the Gallery of Unicode Fonts

Writing system information at Wikipedia, Omniglot, and Mark Shoulson's Visible Speech pages




The four essential
travel phrases in English:

1) Where is my room?
2) Where is the beach?
3) Where is the bar?
4) Don't touch me there!
Do you have a language or dialect to add?
Did I get something wrong?
Please let me know...

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