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Hellenic Languages

I use the term "Hellenic" here to group together standard modern Greek with closely related languages, either in antiquity or among the modern descendants of ancient Greek.

Entries below:  Standard Greek, Pontic, Tsakonian, and Ancient Greek


top Standard Greek (also known as Ellinika, Graecae, Grec, Greco, Neo-Hellenic, and Romaic)

Greek is an official language of Greece and Cyprus. It is also used in parts of many other countries.

Shown using the modern, monotonic system and the pre-1982 polytonic system:

[Standard Greek]

Shown handwritten:

[handwritten Standard Greek]

Language information at Wikipedia and Ethnologue

Writing system information at Wikipedia and Omniglot



top Pontic (also known as Pontic Greek)

Pontic was originally spoken in the Pontus region of the Black Sea but is mainly used today in Greece.

Shown using the modern, monotonic system:

[Pontic]

Language information at Wikipedia, Ethnologue, and the Committee for Pontian Studies (mostly in Greek)



top Tsakonian (also known as Tsakonia)

Tsakonian is used in mountain towns and villages inland from the east coast of the Peloponnesos peninsula of Greece. It is derived from the Doric dialect of ancient Greek spoken by the Spartans.

Shown using the modern, monotonic system and the pre-1982 polytonic system:

[Tsakonian]

Language information at Wikipedia and Ethnologue



top Ancient Greek

Ancient Greek was used on the Greek peninsula & islands, Cyprus, and dozens of independent Greek cities along the Mediterranean and Black Sea coasts from around 700 BCE to 500 CE.

Koiné ("common") speech of around 100 CE was used for the Christian "New Testament" of the Bible:

[Ancient Greek]

Language information at Wikipedia and Ethnologue




The four essential
travel phrases in English:

1) Where is my room?
2) Where is the beach?
3) Where is the bar?
4) Don't touch me there!
Do you have a language or dialect to add?
Did I get something wrong?
Please let me know...

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